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Red-bellied woodpecker, wild turkeys & deer we sighted near Whitby, Ontario

Posted by on January 18, 2013

Wild Turkeys Galore - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

On an unseasonably warm January day, Bob and I visited Lynde Shores Conservation Area in Whitby, Ontario, to do some birdwatching.  No sooner had we entered the grounds than a huge flock of eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) were found clogging the walkway of the Bird Feeding Trail. 

Wild Turkey sits on cedar rail fence - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

The wild turkeys took advantage of the rails to survey their surroundings, and bird watchers carefully deposited birdseed onto the rails to entice the many black-capped chickadees and white-breasted nuthatches into ever closer proximity.

Wild Turkeys Meld into the brush - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

The conservation area is made up of a variety of natural landscapes, so the turkeys can quite easily disappear into the underbrush, as seen here.

White- breasted nuthatch 1, Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

We saw numerous White-breasted Nuthatches (Sitta carolinensis) in the trees along the trail, obviously attracted by the availability of bird food.  As with all nuthatches, they move down the tree trunk head first.  This female can be identified by the chestnut-colored feathers on her lower rear.

White-breasted nuthatch looks at camera - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

The White-breasted Nuthatches were even confident enough to snatch up seeds placed on the cedar rail fence.

White-breasted nuthatch 3 at seeds - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Hand-fed chickadee - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

I haven’t fed chickadees out of my hand since I was a young girl.  This was a nice chance to get a very close look at these cheerful little birds.  The Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) vocalize with the familiar chick-a-dee-dee-dee call.

Red-bellied Woodpecker, male 2 - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Keeping an eye on the website for local bird sightings alerted us to the presence of a Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) at the Lynde Shores Conservation Area.  That is why we went there on this day.  I was thrilled to catch a quick glimpse of one of these woodpeckers as it made off with a peanut in the shell.

Red-bellied Woodpecker, male 1 - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

The range of the Red-bellied Woodpecker typically extends to the northern edge of Lake Ontario, but with the effects of climate change, they are being sighted further north every year.  In this photo, the red belly of the male woodpecker is not visible.

Wild Turkey on the move - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Throughout the afternoon, the wild turkeys were never far from view as they wove through the forest and crisscrossed the walking trails.  Although native to North America, the Wild Turkey got its name due to the trade routes in place during the 16th Century.  The major trade route from the Americas and Asia required goods to go through Constantinople in Turkey en route to Britain. The British at the time, therefore, associated the Wild Turkey with the country Turkey and the name stuck.

Wild Turkey - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

The body feathers are generally blackish and dark brown with a coppery sheen that becomes more complex in adult males.  Their plumage is quite resplendent in shades of iridescent gold, bronze, shades of red, purple and teal when illuminated by the sun’s rays.  The males are substantially larger than the females.

Wild Turkeys - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Marshland ablaze with Red Osier Dogwood - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Whoever said that the landscape in winter is dull has never seen the beauty of Red Osier Dogwood when growing en masse.  When viewed from an elevated observation point, the marshland spread before us in a sea of red.

Searching for deer amongst the dogwood - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

We knew that White-tailed deer live in the conservation area, having seen scat and evidence of the deer browsing on the Red Osier Dogwood.  Blunt ends of the tender stalks showed white where the deer had nipped them off.  Scanning the horizon soon revealed a few of the deer, but they were very difficult to pick out.

Two stationary white-tailed deer - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Can you see the two deer standing stalk still in the tall brown grass?

Lone deer - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

White-tailed deer on the run - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Bob tried to be circumspect as he edged ever closer to the two deer.  When he finally had an unobstructed view, he realized that there were actually 6 deer in the group.  The alarm went up, and they scattered like leaves on the wind, white tails bobbing a warning for all deer to see.

In this video, you get a chance to see the world of the deer underscored by the sounds of Canada Geese overhead.

Hairy woodpecker 3 - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

The hiking trail of the conservation area leads visitors towards the shore of Lake Ontario, but en route, it follows along the edge of a forested area.  Herein, Bob and I took notice of a male Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus) totally engrossed in the job of finding something to eat.

hairy woodpecker 2, Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Hairy Woodpeckers maintain a stiff, upright posture as they move up and down tree trunks in search of a morsel.

Staghorn Sumac - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

A thicket of Staghorn Sumac provided a vibrant burst of colour and enchanted me as I walked beneath the thicket.  Contrasted against the deep blue sky, the conical fruits of the plant brightened the dull browns and greys of the surrounding flatland.

Blazing Sumac Spire - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

A radiant spire of Staghorn Sumac defies the cold winter winds…

Mute swans fly away - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

When 4 Mute Swans (Cggnus olor) took to the air in the distance, we knew that we were nearing the shore of Lake Ontario.

Mute swans on Lake Ontario - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Just offshore from a strategically-placed park bench were 4 more Mute Swans bobbing on the waves.  You would think it was a warm summer’s day.

Mute swan offshore - Lynde Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Mute Swans can be differentiated from Trumpeter Swans because of their orange beaks and black basal knob just above the beak.  They have earned the name Mute Swans because they are generally silent.  They lack the loud discernible calls often characteristic of other bird species.

Departing Mute Swans - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

When the swans took to the air, Bob and I continued along the walking trail back towards the main gate.

Brown-headed Cowbird, female 1 - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Once back in the area where we first saw the Red-bellied Woodpecker, Bob and I scanned the trees very carefully for any flash of red.  The only birds we saw at that late point in the afternoon were some Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater).  They blended in well with the brown and grey leaves on the ground.

Brown-headed Cowbird, female 2 - Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

This female Brown-headed Cowbird was almost invisible in amongst the branches of a low bush.  She can be distinguished by the finch-like head and beak.

Downy Woodpecker at Lynde Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Even though we didn’t catch sight of the Red-bellied Woodpecker for a second time that day, Bob and I were quite entertained by the Downy Woodpeckers (Picoides pubescens) making this forest their home.  Down low…up high…on fallen logs or climbing the side of a tree, they were everywhere.  This male Downy Woodpecker is about half the size of his larger cousin, the Hairy Woodpecker, and has a shorter beak.

The trees are ablaze at Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

As we prepared to leave for home, the setting sun threw the nearby trees into stark silhouette against the brilliant western sky.  The horizon was ablaze with shimmering golds, yellows and reds.

Red sunset over Lynde Shores Conservation Area, Whitby, Ontario

Darkness settled over the Lynde Shores Conservation Area like a warm blanket as the beasts and fowl called it a day.  Ducks glided silently towards the shore, barely disturbing the stillness of the water,  and the world seemed at peace.

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4 Responses to Red-bellied woodpecker, wild turkeys & deer we sighted near Whitby, Ontario

  1. Frank King Photos

    Some real beauties in this collection. I’ve photographed wild turkeys at Lynde Shores, too. Probably the most unexpected wildlife photography I’ve ever done there.

    • frametoframe

      We had gone out to Lynde Shores specifically in search of the Red-bellied Woodpecker. What a surprise to find a flock of turkeys congregated on the trail. They are massive birds, and surprisingly colorful. Although they appear sluggish, wild turkeys can move very quickly. The first time we ever saw one fly was quite revealing, too.

  2. Patricia Lowe

    Nicely done folks. Glad you enjoyed the day at our Conservation Area and shared it.

    • frametoframe

      We have become frequent visitors to your area, walking about Lynde Shores, the West Cranberry Tract and Thickson’s Woods. What a treasure trove of wild fowl. We are so glad that the natural landscape has been preserved there.

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