December 4, 2022

Image Bob launching our canoe at East Beach on Lake of Two Rivers. Algonquin Park, Ontario.

Bob and I decided to go canoeing on the Madawaska River in Algonquin Park after having been told by other canoeists that it was a beautiful route for a fall canoe.  We began our outing by launching our canoe at East Beach on Lake of Two Rivers in Algonquin Park, in Ontario, Canada. 

Image Bob and Jean canoeing in Algonquin Park, Ontario.

We had smiles on our faces because this was only our second full day of sunshine having already experienced 7 dull, chilly and damp days.

Image of tall green trees along a river in Algonquin Park, Ontario.

The reflections on the water of the Madawaska River were incredible.

Image of a common loon in Algonquin Park, Ontario.

When a Common Loon popped up unexpectedly, I had time for only one shot!

Image of Madawaska River in September in Algonquin Provincial Park.

The Madawaska River in September is simply beautiful.

Image of Jean portage at the end of Pog Lake in Algonquin Park.

A very short portage was required around the dam at the end of Pog Lake in order to continue towards Whitefish Lake.

Image of Bob putting canoe on to the river in Algonquin Park.

Spectators watched from the bike trail at the dam at Pog Lake as Bob put our canoe back in the river.

Image of Bob and Jean beside their canoe in Algonquin Park.

Overlooking the quiet water above the dam, we had a picnic lunch.

Image of canoe sitting on the river edge in Algonquin Park.

From the Pog Lake dam, it was a very quiet and peaceful paddle down the Madawaska River to Whitefish Lake. We did hear the occasional person hiking on the trail alongside the river.

Image of beautiful clouds above Algonquin Park.

I was really taken with the variety and ethereal quality of the clouds.

Image of an American Black Duck perched on a fallen log in Algonquin Park.

At one bend in the river, three American Black Ducks perched on a fallen log.

Image of an American Black Duck perched on a fallen log in Algonquin Park.

After a brief show of attitude, one of the ducks decided to check us out and swam towards our canoe.

Image of an American Black Duck swimming along a river in Algonquin Park.

We believe this American Black Duck was an immature individual. It was brave enough to actually swim right over to our canoe and alongside us for many minutes.

Image of an American Black Duck doing the wing thing in Algonquin Park.

When it did its “wing thing”, the duck was too close for my camera.

Image of hills near whitefish lake in Algonquin Park.

A rocky point marked a turn in the river as we neared Whitefish Lake proper.

Image of an Great Blue Heron along the rivers edge in Algonquin Park.

As there was a fairly stiff breeze, Bob and I stuck to the lee shore and scanned the shoreline for animals.  This Great Blue Heron was fishing in one patch of reeds.

Image of an Midland Painted Turtle sitting in the shadows in Algonquin Park.

Midland Painted Turtles were sitting in the shadows.

Image of a Pine Marten along the rivers edge in Algonquin Park.

At one point, I had mentioned to Bob that it was odd that we hadn’t seen a Mink. When movement was noticed on shore, we figured that’s what we had. There was time for only three shots, and it was only later that we determined the animal to be a Pine Marten.

Image of a Pine Marten along the rivers edge in Algonquin Park.

The Pine Marten was in deep shadow, and it moved along quickly after taking a quick look at us.

Image of Centennial Ridges Trail Lookout from a canoe on Whitefish Lake in Algonquin Park.

Our objective was to paddle out onto Whitefish Lake until we had a view of Centennial Ridges Trail Lookout.

Image of Centennial Ridges Trail Lookout from a canoe on Whitefish Lake in Algonquin Park.

There were about a dozen people visible on the rocky cliff.

Image of Bob portaging our canoe in Algonquin Park.

After a short while on Whitefish Lake, we turned back.  We soon were back at the portage to Pog Lake.

Related:

Canoeing Outlet River in Sandbanks Provincial Park

River Otter In Algonquin Provincial Park

Pine Martens During The winter In Algonquin Park

Frame To Frame – Bob and Jean

4 thoughts on “Canoeing The Madawaska River In Algonquin Provincial Park

  1. Thank you for sharing your beautiful trip down the Madawaska River. We will now put it on our to do list. Great pictures!

    1. Hi John. The juvenile duck was a bit naive, we think, and the two adults kept a keen eye on us. It was a pleasure seeing few insects except the occasional dragonfly.

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